Chamomile

Chamomile

Latin: Anthemus nobile, Matricaria chamomilla, Matricaria recutita

Arabic: Babunj

TCM: Huang Chu Ju

“An infusion of the small flower heads acts as a tonic, digestive aid, and calmative, while in large doses, it acts as an emetic and diaphoretic.” (Robert Thomson, in “The Grosset Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine” (1980))

A “carminative and anti-spasmodic.” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

“Anti-spasmodic, carminative, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiseptic, vulnerary…. The apparently endless list of conditions it can help all fall into areas that the relaxing, carminative and anti-inflammatory actions can aid.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

Sunnah Dates in July/August 2018

Sunnah Dates in July/August 2018

INTRODUCTION

The well-known hadith suggests 17, 19 and 21 of the lunar month.   Islamic scholars have advised that cupping is not restricted to those dates. 

We offer hijama cupping every day of the month (except Wednesdays before sunset). 

Each month we publish the Sunnah Dates as published by the Saudi Press Agency, by the Moroccan Ministry of Awqaf and by the ICOUK.

There are differences of opinion about sighting of the new moon. We do not decide who is right nor impose one opinion over others. We simply offer a service to all members of the community whatever view they take about the matter.  And Allah knows best.

 

SUNNAH DATES IN JULY/AUGUST 2018, in shaa Allah

Saudi - UK

Monday 30 July 2018

Friday 3 August 2018

UK-Morocco-Europe

Tuesday 31 July 2018

Thursday 2 August 2018

Saturday 4 August 2018

Please remember that a new Islamic day starts at sunset - Maghrib. 

 

WHY DO YOU OPEN ON WEDNESDAYS?

We advise people not to do hijama cupping between Maghrib (sunset) on Tuesdays and Maghrib (sunset) on Wednesdays. 

We are open on Wednesdays during the day to receive calls, to arrange appointments and give telephone advice.

We see people for appointments on Wednesdays after Maghrib (sunset) because it is Thursday in Islamic terms.

 

IS SUNNAH CUPPING RESTRICTED TO JUST "THE SUNNAH DAYS"?

The short answer is: no.  Because to do so is to restrict the Sunnah of hijama cupping as explained by Ibn Qayyim who advised cupping at any time of the month in respect of certain issues.

Cayenne

Cayenne

 

Latin: Capsicum minimum, Capsicum frutescens

Arabic: Harif

 “[It] is used for a long list of ailments [and can used] as a catalyst for speeding other ingredients quickly throughout the body … to promote and continue the internal combustive heat produced by lobelia, and its always recommended to take the two together… one of the most powerful stimulants known among herbs.” (Robert Thomson, in “The Grosset Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine” (1980))

 “A general vaso-stimulant to the heart, arteries and capillaries, [a] cardio-vascular stimulant” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

“A stimulant, carminative, tonic, sialagogue, rubefacient, antiseptic. Cayenne is the most useful of the systemic stimulants.  It regulates the blood flow, equalising and strengthening the heart, arteries, capillaries and nerves.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

Black Willow

Black Willow

Latin: Salix nigra

Arabic: Safaaf aswad

A “urinary anti-spasmodic.” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

An “anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic, analgesic, antiseptic, astringent. Black Willow is a safe natural source of aspirin-like chemicals, which helps explain its reputation in the treatment of rheumatism and arthritis … and used as part of a wider treatment for any connective tissue inflammation anywhere in the body, … also useful in rheumatoid arthritis.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

 

Image

By PumpkinSky [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Thyme

Thyme

Latin: Thymus Vulgaris

Arabic: Zatar

It has “… a strong, pungent, spicy taste and odor … used medicinally as a tonic, a carminative, an emmenagogue, and an anti-spasmodic. Externally, the oil of thyme is used for toothache, neuralgia, and painful swellings.” (Robert Thomson, in “The Grosset Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine” (1980))

An “anti-septic.” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

A “carminative, anti-microbial, anti-spasmodic, expectorant, astringent, anthelmintic. It can be used … internally for respiratory and digestive infections … asthma.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

Yarrow

Yarrow

Latin: Achillea millefolium

An “astringent, alterative, a diuretic, and a tonic … used to stop [bleeding] … in the treatment of colds, influenza, measles, smallpox, chickenpox, fevers… Yarrow acts as a blood cleanser and opens the pores to permit free perspiration, taking along with it, unwanted waste and thus relieving the kidneys.” (Robert Thomson, in “The Grosset Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine” (1980))

Yarrow is a “stimulating diaphoretic and tonic” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

“Diaphoretic, hypotensive, astringent, diuretic, antiseptic … Yarrow is one of the best diaphoretic herbs and is a standard remedy for aiding the body to deal with fevers. It lowers blood pressure … stimulates digestion …” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

The Effect of Pungent Foods

The Effect of Pungent Foods

Bhikha and Abdul Haq in “Tibb – Traditional Roots of Medicine in Modern Routes to Health” state, “Excess pungent foods [For example, garlic, onion, cayenne, cinnamon, cardamom, cumin, turmeric chilli peppers, black pepper, ginger root, horseradish.] increase heat and dryness and are harmful to the liver and weaken muscular tone.”

Valerian

Valerian

Latin: Valeriana officinalis

Arabic: An-naridin naba'at

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM): Xie Cao

An “anti-spasmodic and a stimulant and is of value in treating hysteria ... and whooping cough. Valerian is used … as a nerve tonic.” (Robert Thomson, in “The Grosset Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine” (1980))

An “anti-spasmodic.” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

“Valerian is one of the most useful relaxing nervines that is available to us.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

Comfrey

Comfrey

Latin: Symphytum officinale

Arabic: As-sanfiitun

A “demulcent, expectorant, and astringent, for almost any condition which requires a general cleansing of the entire internal system. The whole plant is made into a tea and consumed more or less freely for complaints such as arthritis, gallstones, stomach disorders, asthma … and female disorders.” (Robert Thomson, in “The Grosset Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine” (1980))

For external use for “fractures … bruises … ulcers, wounds, inflamed skin…” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

“… a powerful healing agent in gastric and duodenal ulcers, hiatus hernia and ulcerative colitis.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

Echinacea

Echinacea

Latin: Echinacea Angustifolia

 Arabic: 'iishnasa

“It is useful in treating all diseases caused by impurity of the blood.” (Robert Thomson, in “The Grosset Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine” (1980))

A “vaso-tonic alterative, lymphatic vaso-tonic, immune modulator.” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

“Echinacea is the prime remedy to help the body rid itself of microbial infections. It is effective against both bacterial and viral attacks.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

 

Peppermint

Peppermint

Latin: Mentha × piperita

Arabic: Naenae

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM): Bo He

 

“Very hot in nature, peppermint may be use to advantage to promote perspiration and overpower the cold.” (Robert Thomson, in “The Grosset Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine” (1980))

A “gastric adaptogen, gastro-intestinal antispasmodic.” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

“Peppermint is one of the best carminatives available.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

Dan Bensky and Andrew Gamble, in “Chinese Herbal Medicine Materia Medica” list it under “cool acrid herbs that release the exterior”.  It is “acrid, aromatic and cooling … [it] disperses wind-heat.”

Sunnah Dates in July 2018

Sunnah Dates in July 2018

INTRODUCTION

The well-known hadith suggests 17, 19 and 21 of the lunar month.   Islamic scholars have advised that cupping is not restricted to those dates. 

We offer hijama cupping every day of the month (except Wednesdays before sunset). 

Each month we publish the Sunnah Dates as published by the Saudi Press Agency, by the Moroccan Ministry of Awqaf and by the ICOUK.

There are differences of opinion about sighting of the new moon. We do not decide who is right nor impose one opinion over others. We simply offer a service to all members of the community whatever view they take about the matter.  And Allah knows best.

 

SUNNAH DATES IN JULY 2018, in shaa Allah

UK - Saudi - North Africa - Europe

Sunday 1 July 2018

Tuesday 3 July 2018

Thursday 5 July 2018

 

Please remember that a new Islamic day starts at sunset - Maghrib. 

 

WHY DO YOU OPEN ON WEDNESDAYS?

We advise people not to do hijama cupping between Maghrib (sunset) on Tuesdays and Maghrib (sunset) on Wednesdays. 

We are open on Wednesdays during the day to receive calls, to arrange appointments and give telephone advice.

We see people for appointments on Wednesdays after Maghrib (sunset) because it is Thursday in Islamic terms.

 

IS SUNNAH CUPPING RESTRICTED TO JUST "THE SUNNAH DAYS"?

The short answer is: no.  Because to do so is to restrict the Sunnah of hijama cupping as explained by Ibn Qayyim who advised cupping at any time of the month in respect of certain issues.

Cleavers

Cleavers

Latin: Galium aparine

Arabic: Al-Sawatir

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM):  Zhu Yang Yang

 

A “relaxing, diffusive and soothing diuretic.” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

“Cleavers is a very valuable plant and is perhaps the best tonic to the lymphatic system available.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

 

 

Boneset

Boneset

Latin: Eupatorium Perfoliatum

Also known as Feverwort

A “relaxing diaphoretic” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

“Boneset is perhaps the best remedy for the relief of the associated symptoms that accompany influenza … [To] clear the upper respiratory tract of mucous congestion … [[To] ease constipation.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

Burdock Root

Burdock Root

Latin: Arctium Lapa

Arabic: Qartb Akbar

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM): Niu Bang Zi

“Burdock is used the world over as a blood-purifying agent as well as a diaphoretic, a diuretic, and an alterative.” (Robert Thomson, in “The Grosset Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine” (1980))

A “vaso-tonic alterative” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

A “most valuable remedy for the treatment of skin conditions which result in dry and scaly skin. It may be most effective for psoriasis if used over a long period of time. Similarly, all types of eczema (though primarily the dry kinds) may be treated if Burdock used over a period of time … useful as part of a wider treatment for rheumatic complaints, especially where they are associated with psoriasis … It will aid digestion and appetite … in general Burdock will move the body to a state of integration and health…” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

Dan Bensky and Andrew Gamble, in “Chinese Herbal Medicine Materia Medica” say it is, “acrid, bitter, cold … disperses wind-heat … clears heat … vents rashes… moistens intestines…”

Fruit and sour foods at mealtime

Fruit and sour foods at mealtime

Bhikha and Abdul Haq in “Tibb – Traditional Roots of Medicine in Modern Routes to Health” state, “Fruit should preferably be eaten before a meal or on an empty stomach, sour foods [For example, lemons, grapes, oranges, and melon.] can be eaten after a meal as they aid digestion.”

False Unicorn Root

False Unicorn Root

Latin: Chamaelirium Luteum

A “central nervous system tropho-restorative.” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

“…one of the best tonics and strengtheners of the reproductive system that we have. Though primarily used for the female system, it can be equally beneficial for men … The body may use this herb to balance and tone and thus it will aid in apparently opposite situations.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

 

 

Raspberry Leaves

Raspberry Leaves

Latin: Rubus Idaeus,

Arabic: Toot al-aleeq

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM): Fu Pen Zi (translation: “overturned fruit bowl) (Fructus Rubi Chingii)

 

An “excellent herb … one of the best things for women in labor … it is also much used for relief of urethral irritation and is soothing for the kidneys, urinary tract, and ducts.” (Robert Thomson, in “The Grosset Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine” (1980))

A “tonic.” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

An “astringent, tonic, refrigerant, parturient … Raspberry leaves have a long tradition of use in pregnancy to strengthen and tone the tissue of the womb, assisting contractions and checking any haemorrhage during labour. As an astringent it may be used in a wide range of cases, including diarrhoea, leucorrhoea and other loose conditions. It is valuable in the easing of mouth problems such as mouth ulcers, bleeding gums and inflammations. As a gargle it will help sore throats.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

Dan Bensky and Andrew Gamble, in “Chinese Herbal Medicine Materia Medica” say it is, “sweet, astringent, slightly warm … [it] augments and stabilizes the kidneys … assists the Yang and improves vision: for poor vision, sore lower back, and impotence due to Liver and Kidney deficiency.”

Celery Seeds

Celery Seeds

Latin: Apium Graveolens

Arabic: Karafs

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM): Qin Cai

 

As-Suyuti in "Medicine of the Prophet" mentions its neutralizing effects on eating spleen meat.

Ibn Qayyim in "Medicine of the Prophet" said, "…the garden variety sweetens the breath greatly, and if the stem is worn around the neck, it is beneficial for toothache.  It is hot and dry though some say it is moist. It opens obstructions of the liver and spleen. Its leaves, when moist, are beneficial for a cold stomach and liver, are diuretic and emmenagogue, and break stone.  Its seeds have a stronger effect in this and are aphrodisiac and beneficial for bad breath.”

An “anti-septic diuretic.” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

An “anti-rheumatic, diuretic, carminative, sedative … Celery seeds find their main use in the treatment of rheumatism, arthritis and gout. They are especially useful in rheumatoid arthritis where there is associated mental depression.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).

Nettles

Nettles

Latin: Urtica Dioica

Arabic: Qaras

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM): Xun Ma

An “immune modulator and vaso-tonic alterative.” (Menzies-Trull in "The Herbalist's Prescriber")

“Nettles are one of the most widely applicable plants we have. They strengthen and support the whole body.” (David Hoffman in “The New Holistic Herbal”).