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sleep studies

Eating Fish and Quality Sleep

Eating Fish and Quality Sleep

In Tibb (Islamic Medicine), sleep is classified as moistening.

In a recent study by the University of Pennsylvania it was found that, “Children who eat fish at least once a week sleep better and have IQ scores that are 4 points higher, on average, than those who consume fish less frequently or not at all, according to new findings from”

Source

EurekAlert!, the online, global news service operated by AAAS, the science society.

Sleep and Food Intake

Sleep and Food Intake

In Tibb (Islamic Medicine), sleep is classified as moistening.

In a recent study by Kings College London it was found that, ““Sleeping for longer each night is a simple lifestyle intervention that could help reduce intake of sugary foods and lead to a generally healthier diet”

“The fact that extending sleep led to a reduction in intake of free sugars, by which we mean the sugars that are added to foods by manufacturers or in cooking at home as well as sugars in honey, syrups and fruit juice, suggests that a simple change in lifestyle may really help people to consume healthier diets.”

Source

EurekAlert!, the online, global news service operated by AAAS, the science society.

 

Fish, Sleep and IQ

Fish, Sleep and IQ

A study published in December 2017 by Pennsylvania University found that, “Children who eat fish at least once a week sleep better and have IQ scores that are 4 points higher, on average, than those who consume fish less frequently or not at all.” and discussed the link between fish, better sleep and IQ.  (Source: EurekAlert!, the online, global news service operated by AAAS, the science society.)

In Tibb (Islamic Medicine), fish is classified as having cooling and moisturizing properties: food qualities.

Waking Early

Waking Early

Research in 2013 concluded that, “most adverse cardiovascular events tend to happen in the morning” and a 2014 study found that, “People who had most of their daily exposure to even moderately bright light in the morning had a significantly lower body mass index (BMI) than those who had most of their light exposure later in the day.”