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Walnuts and Ulcerative Colitis

Walnuts and Ulcerative Colitis

An August 2019 study by UConn Health and Texas A&M University found that walnuts may give some protection, saying,

“We are continuing our work to understand whether those metabolic changes are part of the protection … We are not suggesting that people with ulcerative colitis be maintained on a large walnut diet between active flares. But, we are hoping that we'll be able to determine the active compounds - nutrients, phytochemicals - in walnuts that cause protection."

 

Adding Vitamin D to Wheat Flour

Adding Vitamin D to Wheat Flour

An August 2019 study the University of Birmingham found that,

"Addressing vitamin D deficiency in the UK requires a multi-disciplinary approach and preventing conditions that are the consequence of deficiency would save the NHS money to the extent that it would more than compensate for the money needed to implement flour fortification at a national level."

"We now hope that UK policy makers will consider a new national policy to fortify foods such as wheat flour with vitamin D to address this serious health issue. This will lead to significant benefits for the population, particularly the most vulnerable groups."

"We have provided compelling evidence that a new strategy is not only safe but would also improve vitamin D intake, which in turn would enhance the health of millions in England and Wales.

"Most previous research into strategies to improve population vitamin D intake have focused only on supplementation programmes, which are generally expensive and not sustainable in the long term.

"Our study showed that, even though supplements are still a viable option for those at a higher risk, food fortification strategies should be prioritized as a response to the rising prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, as it is a safe and cost-saving option.”

 

More on Chicory - Hindaba - Kasni

More on Chicory - Hindaba - Kasni

Ibn Jawziyyah says,

  • “Hindaba temperament changes according to the season. It is cold and wet in winter, hot and dry in summer and mild in spring and autumn. In general, Hindaba is cold and dry. Hindaba is beneficial and cools the stomach and causes constipation.”

  • “When Hindaba, especially wild Hindaba, is cooked and eaten with vinegar, it constipates even more and is more favourable for the stomach and invigorating. [It] strengthens the stomach and opens the clogs in the kidneys, spleen, veins and intestines. It … clears and purifies the kidneys and helps them against the various hot and cold aches.”

  • “The sour Hindaba is the best for the liver, while its extract helps against (jaundice), especially when mixed with wet fennel extract. [It] cleanses and clears the chest and dissipates the heat of irritated blood and bile.”

 

The 5-a-Day Target

The 5-a-Day Target

I remind myself of a 2014 study by the University of Liverpool entitled, “Fruit and vegetable consumption and non-communicable disease: time to update the '5 a day' message?” referred to by Eureka, which suggested that the target should be 7-a-day.

 

Eating Lamb Kidneys and Liver

Eating Lamb Kidneys and Liver

We advised a particular client to eat more lamb kidneys given his particular state of health. He said he had heard that it is makruh or haram.  We disagreed. 

“It says in al-Mudawwanah: that which may be included with meat, such as fat, liver, stomach, heart, lungs, spleen, kidneys, neck, testicles, feet, head and the like, comes under the same ruling as meat.[i.e. it is halal]” 

Tahdheeb al-Mudawwanah by al-Baraadha‘i (1/93). See also Mawaahib al-Jaleel (6/204) 

 

Source

https://islamqa.info/en/answers/126343/ruling-on-eating-the-testicles-of-halal-slaughtered-animals-and-eating-crabs

Flavonoid-Rich Foods May Protect Against Cancer and Heart Disease

Flavonoid-Rich Foods May Protect Against Cancer and Heart Disease

An August 2019 study by Edith Cowan University found that flavonoids have, “The potential to prevent cancer and heart disease …particularly in people at high risk of these chronic diseases … It's important to consume a variety of different flavonoid compounds found in different plant-based food and drink. This is easily achievable through the diet: one cup of tea, one apple, one orange, 100g of blueberries, and 100g of broccoli would provide a wide range of flavonoid compounds and over 500mg of total flavonoids" and, “Flavonoids have been shown to be anti-inflammatory and improve blood vessel function, which may explain why they are associated with a lower risk of death from heart disease and cancer."

 

Young Men and the 5-a-Day Target

Young Men and the 5-a-Day Target

An August 2019 study by the University of East Anglia has found that,

  • "In England about half of men eat less than three portions of fruit and veg a day, and young men aged 18-24 eat the least.

  • "This is really worrying because men are more likely than women to suffer health problems later in life such as coronary heart disease.”

  • "the young men with the best diets really believed in their ability to afford, shop for, prepare and cook fruit and vegetables. These high consumers felt that they had good control of their diet and health, and had positive attitudes towards healthy food. For example they found that cooking and eating healthy food gave them enjoyment, satisfaction and better mood.”

  • "They had a holistic view of health, liked the taste and variety of flavours in fruit and veg and they had learned to cook for themselves.”

  • "Those who weren't eating enough either could or would not cook. For this group, convenience foods were easier and fruit and vegetables were viewed as expensive, not readily available and their preparation time-consuming.”

  • "They had more negative attitudes such as not liking the taste of vegetables, and not finding fruit and veg very filling. Some weren't very open to trying new foods, and most didn't prioritise good health. They hoped they would stay healthy, even though many had close family members suffering from chronic health conditions. Low consumers were also more driven by social influences from friends, family, and social norms.”

  • "Interestingly, both groups believed that fruit and vegetables benefited health and were nutritious.

  • "But none of the young men were aware that eating fruit and vegetables could lower the risk of developing chronic health conditions such as diabetes and heart disease, however, low consumers didn't think too much about their future health and had a 'live for today' attitude.”

  • "Those who didn't eat much fruit and veg had a mistrust of health information. They thought that diet and health promotions should be better designed around their interests - such as sex, exercise and sports, with real examples of male health and fitness.”

Approaches to Health Strategies #2

Approaches to Health Strategies #2

We believe that a core idea for health is that of self-awareness about the things that are good and bad for health in terms of food, drink, types of exercise, climate, the weather, sleep and wakefulness, rest and activity.

Self-awareness includes knowledge and ability (and their development) and self-discipline (and how to improve that.

And, again, that it’s not “one size fits all”. Part of life’s journey is to come ever more aware of your self, your particular purpose. Finding out what’s best for you.

Self-awareness can come at any age, sometimes only after adversity.



Rye Bread

Rye Bread

A July 2019 study by the University of Eastern Finland found rye contributes to good gut health. The study found, "The major role played by gut microbes in human health has become more and more evident over the past decades, and this is why gut microbes should be taken very good care of. It's a good idea to avoid unnecessary antibiotics and feed gut microbes with optimal food - such as rye,"

Our advice is to eat 100% rye bread rather than “rye bread” which has a proportion of wheat flour in it.



Blueberries

Blueberries

  • Support healthy ageing

  • Rank highest in antioxidant activity compared to many other popular fruits

  • Anti-inflammatory

  • 200 grams of blueberries (about one cup) daily can improve blood vessel function and decrease systolic blood pressure

  • Cognitive benefits

  • Improved performance on memory tests by a group of older adults

  • Specific memory effects in children as well as older adults with mild cognitive impairment

 

"Blue versus Gray: Potential Health Benefits of Blueberries for Successful Aging" World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics in July 2017. The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 

 

Vitamin D and Diabetes

Vitamin D and Diabetes

A July 2019 study by the Université Laval in Quebec found, “…improvements in glucose metabolism following vitamin D supplementation in those at high risk of diabetes, or with newly diagnosed diabetes …”

Dr Claudia Gagnon, "Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes are a growing public health concern and although our results are promising, further studies are required to confirm our findings, to identify whether some people may benefit more from this intervention, and to evaluate the safety of high-dose vitamin D supplementation in the long term. Until then I would suggest that current vitamin D supplementation recommendations be followed."

 

Breakfast

Breakfast

Avicenna, Canon of Medicine: “Meal-times,—Burton (vi. 111) mentions "breakfast" (Arab, futur) which is eaten immediately after the dawn-prayer, except in Ramazan. This is a substantial meal of bread and boiled beans, eggs, cheese, curded milk and the pastry called fatirah, followed by coffee."

Eating Wheat

Eating Wheat

“Eating wheat, a grain designed by nature to be eaten in the fall [autumn] to help prepare for winter, was simply never meant to be eaten 3 times a day for 12 months of the year, every year, for a lifetime.”

“Eat Wheat” by John Douillard

The Taste of Bitter Foods Changes. And Why That’s Good

The Taste of Bitter Foods Changes. And Why That’s Good

A July 2019 study published by the University of Buffalo gives hope to all those parents trying to persuade children to “eat your greens!". The study said:

  1. “We've shown in previous work with rats that changing your diet changes what proteins are in your saliva. Now we're showing that the proteins in your saliva change how you taste."

  2. "If we can convince people to try broccoli, greens and bitter foods, they should know that with repeated exposure, they'll taste better once they regulate these proteins,"

  3. "Our data doesn't provide a number, such as 12 servings of broccoli, however, for people who avoid these foods because of their bitterness, but would like to include them in their diet, they should know their taste will eventually change."

  4. "An additive to [pediatric] medicine to make it less bitter would increase compliance,"

  5. "It's similar to liquid dietary supplements in the geriatric population, which often contain sugar to tame the bitterness. Achieving the same result without sweeteners has obvious benefits."

  6. "Instead of having the cognitive load of learning that a food is safe and having to maintain that memory, instead you know that eventually this bitter food will taste good … It's an elegant physiological shift allowing you to put these foods into your diet."

  7. "The variation around sweets is very small," she says. "Nearly everyone likes a cupcake, but the variation around liking broccoli is enormous.

  8. "This research helps explain why that variation with bitter food exists and how we can get more people to eat broccoli instead of cupcakes."

 

NHS Hydration Advice – A reminder

NHS Hydration Advice – A reminder

It might be useful, given this week’s weather, to remind ourselves of the NHS guidelines on hydration.  The Eatwell Guide says we should, “drink 6 to 8 glasses of fluid a day. Water, lower fat milk and sugar-free drinks, including tea and coffee, all count.”

 

Plant-based Diets and Type 2 Diabetes

Plant-based Diets and Type 2 Diabetes

A July 2019 study by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that, “People with the highest adherence to overall predominantly plant-based diets had a 23% lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared to those with weaker adherence to the diets. They also found that the association was strengthened for those who ate healthful plant-based diets.”

 

Organic Apples and Gut Health

Organic Apples and Gut Health

A July 2019 study by Graz University of Technology, Austria found that,

  1. “The bacteria, fungi and viruses in our food transiently colonize our gut … Cooking kills most of these, so raw fruit and veg are particularly important sources of gut microbes."

  2. "Putting together the averages for each apple component, we estimate a typical 240g apple contains roughly 100 million bacteria…"

  3. "Freshly harvested, organically managed apples harbor a significantly more diverse, more even and distinct bacterial community, compared to conventional ones …”

  4. “This variety and balance would be expected to limit overgrowth of any one species, and previous studies have reported a negative correlation between human pathogen abundance and microbiome diversity of fresh produce."

  5. "Escherichia-Shigella - a group of bacteria that includes known pathogens - was found in most of the conventional apple samples, but none from organic apples. For beneficial Lactobacilli - of probiotic fame - the reverse was true."

  6. "Methylobacterium, known to enhance the biosynthesis of strawberry flavor compounds, was significantly more abundant in organic apples; here especially on peel and flesh samples, which in general had a more diverse microbiota than seeds, stem or calyx."

Optimizing Your Intermittent Fasting: the Evidence Base

Optimizing Your Intermittent Fasting: the Evidence Base

A 2018 study found that, “Early Time-Restricted Feeding ETRF improves insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, and oxidative stress.”

A 2018 systematic review concluded that, “Intermittent energy restriction may be an effective strategy for the treatment of overweight and obesity. Intermittent energy restriction was comparable to continuous energy restriction for short term weight loss in overweight and obese adults. Intermittent energy restriction was shown to be more effective than no treatment, however, this should be interpreted cautiously due to the small number of studies and future research is warranted to confirm the findings of this review.”

An Experiment

You may like to try an “early day” intermittent fasting by eating between 7am and 3 pm, or 10am and 6pm, and avoid eating in the evening before bed.

  

Studies and Reviews

1.     Sutton, E.F, Bey, R., Early, K., Cefalu, W.T, Ravussin, E. and Peterson C.M. (2018) Early Time-Restricted Feeding Improves Insulin Sensitivity, Blood Pressure, and Oxidative Stress Even without Weight Loss in Men with Prediabetes. Cell Metabolism, Volume 27, Issue 6, 5 June 2018, Pages 1159-1160

2.     Harris, L, Hamilton, S., Azevedo, L., Olajide, J.,De Brun, C.,Waller, G.,Whittaker, V.,Sharp, T.,Lean, M.,Hankey, K. and Ells, L. (2018) Intermittent fasting interventions for treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports: February 2018 - Volume 16 - Issue 2 - p 507–547. doi: 10.11124/JBISRIR-2016-003248

Eating Protein at every meal: the LoBAG diet

Eating Protein at every meal: the LoBAG diet

In a 2011 study, Gannon and Nuttall of the Minneapolis VA Medical Center studied the effect of a high-protein diet on ghrelin, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor-I and binding proteins 1 and 3 in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.  

They, “…developed a diet that over 5 weeks dramatically lowers plasma glucose in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This diet consists of 30% carbohydrate, 30% protein, and 40% fat and is referred to as a Low Biologically Available Glucose (LoBAG) diet. The diet also resulted in an approximately 30% increase in fasting insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I).”